© 2018 David Huynh | Dreamers | 222

Mysterious Skin

Stage

 

East West Players presents Mysterious Skin by Prince Gomolvilas, based on the acclaimed novel by Scott Heim. This intense drama follows the story of a young man searching for the answers behind the traumatic events of his childhood. The possibility that he may have been abducted by aliens arises, leading him deep into an investigation of the paranormal and his troubled past. The novel was also adapted into a 2004 film by Gregg Araki 

 

Winner: Ticket Holder Award: BEST ACTOR IN A PLAY "MYSTERIOUS SKIN"

 

The cast is outstanding under Tim Dang's thoughtful and caring direction. Huynh and Takeda both give wonderfully layered and complex portraits of the two totally different males. This is riveting, intelligent theatre for the socially conscious...

--Don Grigware

 

...Huynh, who ably handles Neils slow descent into regret and depression as he understands how past mistakes can keep growing.

--Jeff Favre

...it should be noted that the stage performance of David Huynh is without a doubt the highlight of this play. David Huynh is able to invoke the nuances of acting with his body language and facial expressions that are the difference between a good and a great actor.

--Scott Eriksson

 

 

But beyond all mechanisms that make this startlingly brilliant theater, including a stellar supporting cast... the play is lifted from excellent to world-class by the presence of Huynh, whose masterful performance of a young man destroyed by his past is sure to stay in your thoughts and perhaps your own nightmares for a long time to come.

--Travis Michael Holder

...At its heart are two very difficult-to-cast lead roles, both of which have been cast to perfection and are made absolutely, heartbreakingly real by a pair of gifted young actors. Huynh makes for a potent blend of cocky swagger and boyish cuteness, his slight frame so perfectly at odds with Neils decade of sexual experience that its hard to imagine Dang having found a better choice for Heims antihero. 

--Steven Stanley

...an emotional roller coaster for the audience as well as the actors. Capturing the stylized essence of classic Sci-Fi TV, [director Tim] Dang effectively stages eery images as a backdrop to an already pulsating scene. The tension is palpable across the stage and reaches the last rows of the theatre.

--Sylvia Blush

This is a world of young people, lost hours, days or even weeks...

In addition to being strongly cast, Dang's production embraces its dual subjects' creepiness and makes sure that the discomfort of Gomolvilas's characters are every bit our own. 

Neil proves to be a multi-layered character and Huynh creates a persona that is both fast and surprisingly vulnerable.

--Evan Henerson

 

Huyhn exudes a cat-like, mercurial physicality, bringing to mind the work of James Dean. This actor's work is simply breathtaking. He unselfconsciously brought an emotional transparency to the writing without ever "showing" us he was doing so. If you don't know what playing the subtext is, yet, then watch Huynh and you will.

--Louise Larson

...Takeda [and] Huynh, who give performances of affecting vulnerability. In their eyes, the terror and pleasure of contact are very real.

--Charlotte Stoudt

Back Stage

 

Scott Heim's wrenching 1996 novel "Mysterious Skin" was made into an equally wrenching movie by Gregg Araki, never known as a filmmaker hesitant to shock. Now the venerable and often conservative East West Players has joined the fray by presenting the L.A. debut of Prince Gomolvilas' stage adaptation of Heim's original tale, a production unexpectedly even more disturbing than anything ever filmed by Araki.

 

Brian (Scott Keiji Takeda) was only 8 years old when he lost five hours of his life in rural Hutchinson, Kansas, a town bordered on its four sides by a meat packing plant, a prison, the longest grain elevator in the world, and, prophetically, a space museum. A decade later, constantly troubled by dreams seeming to have something to do with his missing five hours, Brian has become convinced he was abducted by aliens, a conviction further fueled when he meets a lonely 32-year-old geek named Avalyn (Elizabeth Liang) who is even more fanatical about close encounters of the third kind than Brian is. Before her clumsy physical advances insinuate there may be other issues distressing Brian, she helps him find Neil (David Huynh), a young man once on his Little League team who is also an integral part of his recurrent visions.

 

Locating Neil, now a self-destructive New York City rentboy, begins to unravel the mystery of the missing five hours. Considering how gritty and creepy the reality of the incident the two shared at age 8 is, perhaps alien abduction would have been preferable, probes and all. Even for a more adventurous viewer, Gomolvilas' penchant for stomach-turning and vivid descriptions of a twisted childhood molestationas well as a bloodily graphic and violent onstage rape sequenceis a bit more than necessary.

 

Under Tim Dang's direction, this is a haunting and unforgettable presentation, starkly designed, somberly staged for an adults-only audience, and performed with a passion that might leave the audience nearly as exhausted as it leaves its two leading actors. The Spartan direction is intensely accentuated by Alan E. Muraoka's towering set, dominated by an ominous moon and high chain-link fencing harshly lit by Jeremy Pivnick. But beyond all mechanisms that make this startlingly brilliant theater, including a stellar supporting cast (particularly the heartfelt work of Takeda and the sweetly sad turn by Liang), the play is lifted from excellent to world-class by the presence of Huynh, whose masterful performance of a young man destroyed by his past is sure to stay in your thoughts and perhaps your own nightmares for a long time to come.

 

--Reviewed by

Travis Michael Holder

Louise On The Left

 

"Mysterious Skin" is, without a doubt, one amazing night of theater: It is undeniably powerful, most certainly shocking and unexpectedly haunting.

 

It is certainly not a show for faint of heart. Trust me: I'm an Orange County, mom, so I can vouch that you should leave Grandma and the kids at home for this one. However, for the rest of us living in 2010, it was a very moving, memorable theatrical experience.

 

Everything, from the cast to the elegantly paced direction, exemplified what kind of magic happens when talented people come together and focus on a shared vision. This was evident last night.

 

I have to admit, that while watching "Mysterious Skin" I was reminded of another play,"Angels in America," which was similar to this production in a variety of ways. Although it is hardly derivative of Tony Kuschner's "Angels in America" there are some parallel aspects to both plays. I won't give away any spoilers, but the parallels are not just in the narrative, but also in the kind of writing that just jumps off the page. It's at turns, terse, funny and unexpectedly moving, all woven together into an astonishing ensemble piece all reminding me how fortunate I was to have seen this particular production with this cast at this time. I know how rare it is for everything to come together so seamlessly as this ensemble piece does with such elegance.

 

Performances such as David Huynh's work as Neil in the play, as well as Scott Keiji Takeda's Brian, each provide a lovely counterpoint to the other. One graceful, bold and evocative, the other character eerily imploding under the weight of his character's burden. A moving journey through unexpected territory, thanks to the combined talent of both Heim and Gomolvilas.

 

Huyhn exudes a cat-like, mercurial physicality, bringing to mind the work of James Dean. This actor's work is simply breathtaking. He unselfconsciously brought an emotional transparency to the writing without ever "showing" us he was doing so. If you don't know what playing the subtext is, yet, then watch Huynh and you will.

 

All in all, last night was the first night of a ground-breaking theatrical run which I can honestly say was as memorable as it was thought provoking. I can't recommend it enough.

 

--Louise Larson

read the entire article here. 

Stage Scene LA

 

Mysterious Skin, Scott Heims powerful 1995 novel about two teenagers with a shared secret almost too horrendous to talk about, is the kind of book that would seem unadaptable to screen or stage, if only for its scenes of child sexual abuse. Still, miracle of miracles, Mysterious Skin The Movie and Mysterious Skin The Play did end up written, produced, and presented to audience bravos, the former by film maker Gregg Araki and the latter by playwright Prince Gomolvilas. Its Gomolvilas ingenious stage adaptation that now gets an absolutely stunning Los Angeles Premiere at Little Tokyos East West Players in a production easily the Asian-American theaters finest non-musical since Durango, three years ago.

 

Theatergoers should be forewarned that child sexual abuse, though never shown, is talked about in explicit terms, that there is ample foul language and a simulated yet graphic gay rape scene involving a very brief flash of frontal nudity. Still, though socially conservative East West regulars may balk (and even write a few angry emails) about the R-rated subject matter, East West Players decision to push the envelope with Mysterious Skin will be greeted with cheers by audience members wanting to be challenged and dazzled by daring, beautifully staged and acted, cutting-edge material.

 

Gomolvilas script is brought to striking life by Tim Dang's inspired direction, the performances he elicits from his superb cast among the best Ive seen at East West.

 

At its heart are two very difficult-to-cast lead roles, both of which have been cast to perfection and are made absolutely, heartbreakingly real by a pair of gifted young actors. Looking considerably like the film adaptations Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Huynh makes for a potent blend of cocky swagger and boyish cuteness, his slight frame so perfectly at odds with Neils decade of sexual experience that its hard to imagine Dang having found a better choice for Heims antihero. And if Act One can be said to belong to Huynhs foul-mouthed yet sweet-at-heart Neil, its Takeda who gets the prime acting challenge in Act Two, one which he nails to perfection, his characters nerdy comic charm making way for some of the most moving work youre likely to see any time soon.

 

Mysterious Skin offers East West Players the rare opportunity to achieve two of its primary goals: to spotlight the work of an Asian American playwright and to give Asian American actors access to roles too often denied them by the kind of narrow-thinking casting that remains too often the rule, not only in Hollywood but in Los Angeles theater. With a baseball leitmotiv running throughout the play, it seems entirely appropriate to declare that with Mysterious Skin, Tim Dang and East West Players have scored a home run.

 

--Steven Stanley 

 

For entire review read here.

Curtain Up - Los Angeles

 

From a plot point of view, at least, the less revealed about Prince Gomolvilas's Mysterious Skin the better. Not that staying in the dark will be so very easy since Mysterious Skin was adapted from a novel by Scott Heim and has previously been a low budget 2005 film with Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Brady Corbet and Elisabeth Shue.

 

Go in cold to the play's L.A. premiere directed at East West Players by Tim Dang, and you'll likely find yourself drawn into a world  and a supposition  that is as eerie and discomforting as its title suggests. This is a world of young people, lost hours, days or even weeks; inexplicable nose bleeds and the seemingly too real prospect of alien abductions.

 

We begin the play with two people, a boy of 18, a woman of 32, for whom the very possibility of extra terrestrial encounters isn't just a possibility, it's a lifeline. Without this possible explanation, Avalyn Friesen, 32 who is holed up in her Kansas bedroom, would be in some serious existential trouble as well as being a lonely misfit.

 

As it turns out, the creepy, Halloween-worthy backdrop of things unknown is something of a dodge. There are grim, dark secrets to be unearthed in spooky abandoned houses, and two 18-year-olds living thousands of miles apart will have to meet and reconnect in order to bring them cathartically into the light, but they do not have to meet at Roswell. The likelihood, is that once these secrets are revealed, the result is a kind a shrug. Awful, but not earth-shattering, a kind of a standard issue revelation.

 

The build-up is something else entirely. In addition to being strongly cast, Dang's production embraces its dual subjects' creepiness and makes sure that the discomfort of Gomolvilas's characters are every bit our own. There is a first act closing scene, violent and as quease-inducing as anything placed on stage in recent memory followed  15 semi merciful minutes later  by the play's revelation. Dang might have better opted to skip the mercy and stage Mysterious Skin without an intermission. Better, it seems, not to let an audience catch its breath.

 

Gomolvilas opens his play with the only person in Mysterious Skin who appears to have his foundation underneath him: Benjamin (played by Marcus Choi) an alien parapsychologist lecturing to explain the symptoms (or, if you prefer, the rules) of alien abduction. The likelihood, he argues, is that aliens exist. They operate by stealing time from their abductees (which the abductees never get back) and they implant some sort of tracking system within their contact-ee's skin.

 

Choi, who plays three or four other parts in the play, is all business. And then the expert disappears from the play leaving the potential followings of his teachings to figure things out for themselves. Which is precisely what Avalyn (Elizabeth Liang), a 32 year old community college student, has spent the better part of the last two decades doing. Possessed as she is with so much unaccounted for time, Avalyn works and reworks her hypotheses. Her glasses are too big even for 1991, and her clothes a bit outdated. She's a KIIS fan. Everything about her appearance, manners, etc. say "weirdo." She's looking for fellow abductees. In Kansas, where she lives, there aren't many, although you would think maybe with all those corn fields. . .. But in Kansas there is Bryan Lackey (Scott Keiji Takeda), 18, a New York transplant who does also in fact seem to have some missing time on his hands, who experiences nosebleeds and who is open to Avalyn's hypotheses. In her own semi subtle way, Avalyn takes to Bryan like a heroin addict to the needle. She's that lonely.

 

Back in New York, Neil McCormack, also 18, tells his "seriously pissed off fag hag" friend Deborah (Christine Corpuz) that he's been "going out again," meaning Neil's hustling, taking money for sex from older men. A bit of a thrill seeker, Neil can't really resist the temptation of the money. Deborah excepted, Neil has left plenty of things and people behind: family, past lovers a future. And aliens or no aliens, there are parts of his life he simply has no interest in remembering or revisiting. But this man who likes his connections casual will have to do some serious reconnecting, for Brian's sake as much of his own.

 

Neil proves to be a multi-layered character and Huynh creates a persona that is both fast and surprisingly vulnerable. Takeda's Brian is a character who is potentially even more lost, but Gomolvilas &mdash and his play &mdash are more concerned with Neil, the man with the answers.

 

About that afore referenced scene that closes Act 1. It's a hugely cathartic double seduction (more like two rapes, actually) taking place in bedrooms which are thousands of miles apart. Dang places the two encounters side by side, occurring simultaneously, permitting us to shift or avert our gaze when things start to get intense. Which is often.

 

Although we are eventually plunged into blackout, when the lights come out, we are left with two casualties who bruised and bloodied, and stumble agonizingly back into their clothes. The house lights are left on as this is happening, giving the proceedings an even more public and intrusive feeling. Once the stage is finally empty (house lights still on) it's finally intermission. Collective exhale.

 

Obviously, nobody can end a play like this. Mysterious Skin has a second act catharsis up its sleeve, one that is &mdash while horrifying &mdash easy to get one's mind around and not entirely unexpected. If it seems a little unfair to consider oneself cheated when the aliens don't arrive, well, there it is. The production makes effectively ominous use of the enormous moon-shaped projection surface center stage (set and projections are by Alan E. Muraoka) and John Zalewski's sound. 

 

--Evan Henerson

Asians On Film

Interview with Scott Eriksson

 

1. As a Canadian working in Hollywood , do you find you have added obstacles or considerations to getting acting roles?

 

David: From my personal experience, the biggest obstacle I faced from being a Canadian actor in Los Angeles, was only administrative, i.e. gaining clearance to work, or even to be in this city. I find most people are impressed with actors from Canada, especially since they are familiar with names like Jim Carrey, Michael J. Fox and especially young actors like Michael Cera and Ellen Page. That said, when I walk into a room for an audition or meeting, and with them knowing Im from Canada, it makes me feel a certain amount of pressure; I better be good, or get the fuck out of this town.

 

2. Your career thus far has been dominated by theater and television roles. What are the different challenges for you as an actor working between theater, television and film? Which do you think is more difficult for an actor? Which do you prefer?

 

David: One could say that the foundation of each medium, theatre, film and television are the same, that being the challenge to obtain honesty and truth. But with theatre the challenge for me is the focus of the moment. From waiting in the wings to the time you walk on a stage the focus is the challenge. You have to leave behind everything that just happened the moment before and forget things like you are sweating buckets under stage lights when in fact you are behaving like its the dead of winter. For me, theatre ultimately challenges my imagination. Film, though it can be as difficult, provides the environment and that is more tangible for me so the challenge lies in my commitment to the character. These days, actors on television talk with lightening speed and keeping up the pace of dialogue in television can be challenging. For me, theatre is the most challenging, rewarding and spiritual experience I get from the three mediums. I love the theatre, good theatre, that is.

 

3. You are now starring on stage in Mysterious Skin and Dustin Nguyens film Fool For Love is being released in the USA at the same time! What can you tell us about the upcoming film Saigon , CA being directed by Mark Tran who you also worked with in All About My Dad that is said to star you and Dustin!

 

David: Unfortunately, I cant really comment on this question. The film has yet to be made, and to be honest Im not sure if and when it will. I love Dustin Nguyen. I really wish we could work together really soon. And Mark Tran is a fantastic director. Hopefully something will work out for the three of us!

 

4. While nudity in theater is nothing new, it is much more foreign to asian actors and asian theater. Was that something that concerned you when considering the role for Mysterious Skin?

 

David: Not initially. I knew that if I worked on Mysterious Skin that yes, nudity was going to be involved, but it didnt bother me until I started to talk about it to my friends. Someone who I respect as an artist told me that she does not favor nudity in art, thats a subjective choice, but my respect of her made me think again about this aspect. Also, other actor friends of mine doubted the choice as well, so, thats when I became concerned about the decision and that was before the nudity was even rehearsed. I trust my fellow actor, Marcus Choi, who shares that particular scene with me. To be honest, Im not sure if I really could do the scene with anyone else. We developed such a quick bond and deep trust as actors, that once we did it, it was no problem.

 

5. It is possible that Mysterious Skin could be extended to more performances and more cities if it is successful. Are you committed to a long run if that happens or do you have other acting projects in the works already?

 

David: East West Players have extended performances before, but only if there is demand. So I think theres a possibility, but we are not contractually held to it. Mysterious Skin is a fantastic play. If the opportunity comes, I would certainly run with it. Theres some other things going on, but to be honest, Mysterious Skin kicks their ass. Um, actually I think just by saying that, maybe I dont have other projects going on anymore! That is if a producer reads this ah fuck em. This show is amazing!

 

--Scott Eriksson

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

LA Theatre Review

 

In an instant this seemingly quirky tale about a young man who believes he was abducted by aliens is turned by the obvious revelation that his recurring dreams are not what they seem. Presented by East West Players (EWP), Mysterious Skin, is a dark drama set in Kansas and New York City in 1991.

 

Kansas: Brian Lackey (Scott Keiji Takeda), turns to Avalyn Friesen (Elizabeth Liang), a fellow believer in alien abductions, for help in uncovering the mysteries that plague him nightly. As they slowly piece together fragments of his nightmares, he realizes the boy being probed in his dreams, Neil McCormick (David Huynh), was a team member from his little league years.

 

New York: Neil is living out his fantasies as a hustler for the money, sex, and perhaps love. After a bad night picking up a trick, Neil returns to Kansas only to find Brian waiting for him; hoping he holds the key to regain his sanity.

 

Directed by EWPs Producing Artistic Director Tim Dang, Mysterious Skin, is an emotional roller coaster for the audience as well as the actors. Capturing the stylized essence of classic Sci-Fi TV, Mr. Dang effectively stages eery images as a backdrop to an already pulsating scene. The tension is palpable across the stage and reaches the last rows of the theatre. However, playwright Prince Gomolvilas doesnt offer much more mystique within the text to draw your attention in act two.  We quickly learn enough nuggets of information to help us connect the dots faster than the characters. This lack of dramatic anticipation draws out act two to a lull, but is saved by the performances.

 

Mr. Takeda and Christine Corpuz (Deborah, Margaret, Wendy, Receptionist) give stellar performances. Ms. Corpuz, is as flawless an actor as they come. Seamlessly stringing together four varying characters with depth and purpose. Mr. Takeda holds fast to his emotions and carefully reveals the complex layers of Brians state of being. His final moments on stage make up for the lack of text support in act two and reveal a vulnerable eight year old in this young mans flesh.

 

Upon entering the theatre, my breath was taken away by Allan E. Muraokas stunning set. The projection design creates a new environment for each scene and serves the play well as it propels itself onto the actors as a portal into another realm. Coupled with Jeremy Pivnick and John Zalewskis designs (light and sound respectively), the stage was set for an out of this world experience. As lights surged intermittently during pre-show, a satellite image of earth towered behind chain linked fences which served as walls for Brians room and a cafe in New York.

 

Mysterious Skin offers a unique look at the connection between alien abduction and our human need to suppress hurtful memories. Sci-Fi fanatics be warned: Except for a couple of UFO tales, the play is hardly about debunking or confirming theories on the existence of alien life. This is not a discouragement, however, to treat yourself to a provocative night of theatre.

 

--Sylvia Blush

 
 
 

Los Angeles Times

 

Its not outer space but inner demons that menace in Mysterious Skin, the dark drama now staged by East West Players at the David Henry Hwang Theater. Nerdy Brian (Scott Keiji Takeda) believes he was abducted by aliens at the age of 8, an event somehow tied to Neil (David Huynh), a former Little League teammate turned hustler. As Brian puts together the broken clues of his life, he begins to wonder whether he was probed by space creatures or experienced a close encounter of a more earthly kind.

 

Gregg Araki filmed Scott Heims cult novel in 2004 to some acclaim, with Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Neil. This East West Players stage production captures a certain eerie vibe, enhanced by John Zalewskis sound design and Alan E. Muraokas set, a chain link fence behind which looms a massive blue moon. But while Prince Gomolvilas adaptation contains some strong monologues, his sense of narrative falters. The storytelling is schematic, and Brians quest never feels as urgent as Neils self-destructive path. Its a shortcoming that cant be blamed on Takeda or Huynh, who give performances of affecting vulnerability. In their eyes, the terror and pleasure of contact are very real.

 

For mature audiences only.

 

--Charlotte Stoudt

Broadway World

 

Provocative, imaginative material about sexual abuse, despite its uneasy and controversial nature, can fascinate, and this Los Angeles premiere Mysterious Skin @ East West Players begs to be seen.

 

Dividing scenes between fantasy and reality, in Act I on stage right we see Brian (Scott Keiji Takeda), obsessed with nightmares of 'being abducted by aliens' as an eight year-old, and on stage left, another young man of similar age, who has become a full-fledged male hustler: Neil (played by David Huynh). In this half the theory of alien abduction is given equal focus to the issue of prostitution, but the two elements are distinctly unrelated. They do not intersect until Act II, when the two boys meet and see that they have something in common from the past which has irrevocably damaged their lives.

 

The cast is outstanding under Tim Dang's thoughtful and caring direction. Huynh and Takeda both give wonderfully layered and complex portraits of the two totally different males. In the long run their truthful interactions prove somewhat therapeutic. Elizabeth Liang is precious as Avalyn, so desperately lonely and in love with Brian. Everyone has had a close friend like Avalyn at some point in their lives and Liang makes us recall that person. Christine Corpuz as Deborah is smart, outspoken and completely supportive of Neil and is equally terrific playing three other roles. Ruffy Landayan and Marcus Choi display tremendous versatility in a variety of roles. Choi has his finest hour as the deceptive rough trick and Landayan, sweet and tender as Eric, who has deep feelings for Neil.

 

Dang's direction could not be better, as we are pulled in to what appears at first glance to be a taut and chilling sci-fi adventure and then suddenly jolted back to the starkly real facts of the case ... with some mercy and spiritual consolation appearing at the very end. Very interesting and eerie to have actors look at other actors as they are exiting the stage, even if they are not in the actual scene with them. A fascinating experience, all!

 

Set and projection design by Alan E. Muraoka is to be especially singled out for its darkly bold and engaging look. It is a tad disconcerting to have the projected images change so often during a scene, though, as one may focus on that and lose track of the content of the actual scene.

 

This is riveting, intelligent theatre for the socially conscious, but its nudity, foul language and sexual situations make it off limits to young children and for those adults less open-minded.

 

--Don Grigware

LA Downtown News

 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - ...The emotionally draining second act outweighs earlier shortcomings, thanks in part to powerhouse performances by David Huynh and Scott Keiji Takeda as two young men from a small Kansas town. They share a psychologically devastating past, which sent them down quite different paths.

 

In the second act, all of the elements come together and work in harmony. Dang slows the action and allows the competent cast a chance to explore the quirky characters.

 

Most impressive is Takeda, who in his professional theater debut displays raw, natural sorrow as the troubled Brian. His despair at not knowing his past is palpable. He is complemented by Huynh, who ably handles Neils slow descent into regret and depression as he understands how past mistakes can keep growing.

 

--Jeff Favre

ladowntownnews.com

 

Read full review here.

 

Asiansonfilm.com

 

Gregg Araki did a masterful job of bringing Scott Heim's Mysterious Skin to the big screen and now Prince Gomolvilas has done a brillant job of bringing the book to stage with the East West Players. While the costume design is a weak spot and a bit distracting at times, the cast is strong and kudos go out to Alan Muraoka's set and projection design which is simple but so powerful and effective.

 

Ultimately what brings any written work to life is the directing and the acting and neither disappoints. That said, it should be noted that the stage performance of David Huynh is without a doubt the highlight of this play. While there are many good actors in this production including standout performances by Elizabeth Liang and Marcus Choi, David Huynh is able to invoke the nuances of acting with his body language and facial expressions that are the difference between a good and a great actor.

 

Now for the bad news. To see this you must be in Los Angeles where it officially opens on September 15th and is scheduled to run through October 10th, but it is a such a great production we can all hope it will continue its run much longer and be seen in other cities as well.

 

--Scott Eriksson

Asiansonfilm.com

 

LA Downtown News

 

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES - Mysterious Skin, the first play in East West Players 2010-11 season, is probably not what longtime audiences of the Little Tokyo-based theater company are expecting.

For one, there is the sensitive subject matter. But the thing more likely to surprise those in attendance is the onstage nudity.

 

Canadian actor David Huynh, who plays Neil the hustler, said the role is one of the toughest parts he has ever had.

 

The reality of the story is the most important thing about the play, the reality of these characters. Its a story that rings true for a lot of people, he said. The first act ends with a bang and itll shake people and test the audiences perspective of theater.

 

-Richard Guzmán

ladowntownnews.com

page 25, 09/13/2010

 

Read the entire article here.